Prensa Publicada

  • Título: Jeremy Deller en Proa
    Autor: Ines Viturro
    Fecha: 07/02/2018
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Pics de Arte)

    El 12 de diciembre inaugura la muestra “El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular”,de Jeremy Deller con la que Fundación Proa cierra el año. Pude ver el montaje en una suerte de #emptyproa al que me invitaron hace un par de días. Para quienes solemos recorrer museos siempre suma ver el making, ir apreciando la muestra de a poco y tener la posibilidad de escuchar a los curadores.

    Jeremy Deller es uno de los artistas contemporáneos más importantes, él como pocos analizó la escena cultural, social y política británica desde principios de los 90 a nuestros días. “Al trabajar desde la cultura popular británica en el fondo es trabajar sobre la cultura popular en el mundo, por el nivel de influencia que ha tenido esta sobre todo en términos de la música “, me explicó Amanda de la Garza co curadora de esta muestra panorámica  junto a Cuauhtémoc Medina y Ferrán Barenblit
.

    Deller realizó varios videos que introducen temas históricos y políticos a través de la música y personajes conocidos. Varios de ellos los podremos ver en Proa. La Batalla de Orgreave  (si hieren a uno hieren a todos)” recrea la gran lucha de los mineros en la huelga de 1984. “Nuestro hobbie es Depeche Mode”, conocido por los fans de la banda sigue de cerca a varios fanáticos del grupo en Europa del Este, Estados Unidos, México y Brasil.

    Se pidió a Gualicho, un street artist local que realizara un mural alegórico a la obra “Tantas maneras de hacerte daño (vida y obra de Adrian Street)”. El video montado sobre el mural testimonia la historia de Adrian Street, el luchador travesti que volvió a las minas a fotografiarse con su padre.

    Para la inauguración también se verá en una de las paredes del barrio de La Boca, frente a Fundación Proa una de las grandes obras de Deller. “Se necesita más poesía”.

    “Al hacer una obra estás revelando algo. No quiero hacer una especie de trabajo político en el sentido que un activista haría un trabajo político. Quiero darle un poco más de poesía, un poco más de espacio, para que la gente pueda maniobrar. Las palabras “arte” y “político” no son necesariamente las dos mejores palabras para unir en ocasiones, así que quiero tener un poco de espacio para el pensamiento y no decir a otros lo que deben pensar”, explica de su trabajo Deller que viene a la Argentina para presentar su muestra.

    Dos curiosidades: al mismo tiempo esta muestra se está viendo en el Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de México. Pero aquí en Buenos Aires veremos dos piezas que no se ven allá. A no perdérsela.

    Hasta marzo de 2016 en Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929, Capital.

    -



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Artists are allowed to do irresponsible things
    Autor: Silvia Rottenberg
    Fecha: 31/01/2016
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Buenos Aires Herald)

    British artist Jeremy Deller talks about being a provocateur and the shock value of art

    Jeremy Deller: The infinitely Variable Ideal of the Popular is currently on display at PROA. The show gives an overview of the well-known British artist who questions, probes and playfully comments on today’s society and pop culture. The Herald met the artist on the terrace of the PROA, looking out on his public intervention: — a painting on a distant wall which reads ‘We need more poetry.’ Deller orders a beer, as the sun is hot and the breeze of air conditioning coming from inside barely reaches the table where the show’s curator, Cuauhtemoc Medina, also joins us. In fact, the curator’s presence prompts the first question. During the tour of the exhibition, it was the curator who spoke the most. The artist rarely contributed. Why?

    Jeremy Deller: I trust Cuauhtemoc completely. Absolutely, would I say different things. But this was best.

    BA Herald: When we came to Acid Brass Live at Lovebox (a project where Deller combines acid house with brass-band music), you spoke out and mentioned its importance.

    JD: It was a defining moment in my career. I realized then that I didn’t have to make things, but make things happen … The video shows the outcome and the mind map next to it explains why I was really doing it: to show that I did not do it as a joke, or for absurd reasons. I made it because these two music movements are deeply connected through history and politics and social change. A lot of my work has the potential to be a disaster. Like the miner strike piece could have been a disaster. It’s almost a comedy, like a Monty Python.

    The miner strike piece or the Battle of Orgreave is Deller’s signature work, which put him in the spotlight and helped him win the coveted Turner Prize. It’s a re-enactment film of the clash between striking miners and the UK police in Orgreave in 1984.

    The film is far from a disaster.

    Partly because it’s on the edge of being a disaster, because it’s so stupid. And artists are allowed to do irresponsible, stupid things. Which is good. Someone has to do that. I prefer an artist to do a stupid thing than a politician. Since usually that ends up in more disasters.

    Have you done projects that were too much of a disaster to show?

    I try to forget those. I can’t remember… (laughs)

    In the show, only your best works are on display. Did you take part in the selection process?

    The curator was 90 percent responsible. (Turning to Cuauhtemoc Medina:) I mean, you knew what you wanted. Then we discussed it.

    Cuauhtemoc Medina: He brought in the new piece.

    BAH: The film that you recently made for the Lyon Biennale?

    CM: Dancing girls and French pretentiousness.

    JD: A slightly pervy film. (laughs)

    Rhythmaspoetry (2015) is a filmed choreography of an elderly white man at his home, surrounded by sensual dancing non-white ladies, whom he appears not to see, while he raps about them and the culture they stand for.

    BAH: It has a lot to do with exoticism, doesn’t it?

    JD: It has to do with this man, who was a local politician, the head of the tourist industry in Lyon. He has a very specific view of Lyon. How it should change and be a different kind of place. It’s so conservative now. Lyon was marked by World War II, then freemasonry is huge there, integration failed, its outskirts are some of the biggest in the country, with all the poor people living there and the rich in the city centre. He is unhappy about that. With the film (all lyrics are the former politician’s own words) he was actually saying what he believes in. So, the film is serious, but presented in a strange way, because of these women dancing like spirits around him. I suppose these women are exotic, but they are French. They were born in France. They are not immigrants. That is the reality of France. It’s a multicultural society. Like Britain.

    CM: I don’t think they’re exotic. It’s about the other versus the self.

    JD: True, it was an unusual thing for this 75-year-old man to have these three women dancing around him.

    BAH: Does this work have to do with your fascination with marginalized people?

    JD: These people literally live in the margins. The centre of Lyon is beautiful. Like Paris. But the outskirts are totally different. It’s this problem that the cities of France, and Britain as well, have: distinct worlds. So that is what he is talking about (in the video). These women are around him while he is gardening. They are on his mind. I know it’s a kind of strange film. When I made it I was like ‘Fuck, what have I made? The film is a bit weird.’

    BAH: Indeed...

    JD: It can go in different directions. The choreographer, Cecilia (Bengolea, an Argentine, with whom Deller also collaborates on a work for the Sao Paulo Biennial) was extreme. She wanted it to be odd and slightly politically incorrect, which I like.

    You like its political incorrectness?

    JD: I like that it potentially is politically incorrect. Or that people go ‘Oh, what is happening here? I am not quite sure about this…’ Like when people said with the miners’ strike that it was a sacrilege to be taking it on. We, as artists, should push what people think is acceptable. So that’s what we are doing with that film. Making things a bit messy. Being messy with contemporary culture. Doing things that are slightly awkward and potentially leave a bad taste.

    Why would you want to leave a bad taste?

    Because I think it’s good to do that, sometimes.

    To shock people?

    No, to make people feel uncomfortable. I quite like that.

    Why?

    I don’t know. It’s in my nature. I don’t like confrontation very much, but I like making it.

    Isn’t that cruel, to impose on others what you do not like yourself?

    Well, I am usually there when it happens. Even though I find it unbearable myself. This thing I did in America in 2009. That was really confrontational. It’s not in this show. I managed to take a bombed car from Baghdad and tour it around all the right-wing states: Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, Arizona. Towed on the back of a lorry. That was dangerously politically incorrect. A stupid thing to do. But I was present at that.

    Why was it dangerous?

    Well, think about it. We are taking a blown-up car, bombed by terrorists … and showing it in public places. In areas where fathers, brothers, or sons might have been or still were in Iraq. They could have a different political view, not want to see it or be offended. It was a provocation and we were lucky. We weren’t attacked. Having taken it around America was perhaps stupid, but there were a lot of reasons why I did it. Only an artist could have done that.

    It being art makes it safe?

    Art makes it possible. No one was really interested in the art element. When you bring it to the streets of New Orleans, no one gives a shit about art. They care about the car. Art is a space where you can experiment. With objects. And with history. With a social history that is still unformed, that you can mould.

    Some people who will enter this show might wonder, ‘is this art?’

    Well, I hope so ... I mean, of course it’s art.

    It could also be seen as a series of investigations of popular culture.

    I don’t think people care. When visitors come, they just want it to be good. I don’t care if people see it as art, as long as they like it really.

    As long as they like it, or are being made feel uncomfortable?

    Depends on what they are looking at. Some things are there to cause discomfort, some to be enjoyed. I make very different art. Not just to make people feel uncomfortable. That would be very stressful. I’m not that kind of person. I think people are very relaxed when it comes to art. At least they are in Britain. Contemporary art is like the dominant art form, after TV. It’s part of the national conversation. Which has a lot to do with the funding of art. It’s important the state is involved. Because if it doesn’t, it becomes like America: privatized, in the hands of the elite, a pursuit for the rich, tailored for them. When I show in America, I always have to meet the rich people on the first night. And then the next day, go to their house, and meet them again.

    And then they buy your work?

    No, the opposite. Then they ask for a work for the auction to fundraise for the museum. They love what you do, but they don’t buy it, because it’s too complicated. They can’t hang it up, you know. Institutions buy things.

    One of the works in the show is about the future of museums — a series of posters publicizing shows that could one day happen.

    Yes, and some of them are actually happening now! For instance, in 1995 I did a poster advertising a show on David Bowie, which is an actual show now touring the world (presently in Groningen, The Netherlands). It’s a prophecy really…

    The prophet moves on from beer to Gancia, reminiscing about British music of the 70s, when rough social changes were taking place in the country — which he touches on in English Magic, a critically ironic remix of his 2013 Venice Biennale show.

    Where and when

    Until March at PROA (Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929, La Boca). Open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 11am to 7pm. Check the website for the screening of Deller’s film Our Hobby is Depeche Mode: www.proa.org

    -



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Jeremy Deller en Fundacin PROA.
    Autor: Revista Mic
    Fecha: 14/01/2016
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Revista Mic)

    Fundación Proa presenta la primera exhibición del artista Jeremy Deller en Argentina. Una selección de obras que abarca un extenso período de su producción, desde los años 90 hasta la actualidad, incluyendo English Magic (Magia Inglesa) con el cual representó al Reino Unido en la Bienal de Venecia del 2013.

    Desde sus inicios Deller experimenta en diversas artísticas, como la fotografía, el video arte y la instalación, recuperando la estética pop o popular en cada una de sus obras. Muchas de ellas están presentes en la exhibición, brindando un destacado panorama de su imaginario artístico.

    En las diversas salas encontraremos instalaciones, posters, videos e incluso un graffiti realizado por un artista local. Estas obras nos permiten sumergirnos en detalles significativos, tanto de acontecimientos históricos, como es el caso de La Batalla de Orgreave, que recrea la lucha de los mineros británicos y su enfrentamiento con las fuerzas policiales en los 80s, como de casos particulares que reflejan una dimensión social más amplia, como en Tantas maneras de hacerte daño, video que repasa la peculiar vida de Adrian Street, minero británico devenido en luchador trasvestido. The history of the World (La Historia del Mundo), por su parte, es un esquema dibujado sobre la pared que ilustra conexiones sociales, políticas y musicales entre la música house y las brass bands británicas. Pero es, sobre todo, un resumen de la historia británica y de cómo el país cambió de la era industrial a la post-industrial.

    La muestra ha sido curada por Amanda de la Garza, Ferran Barenblit y Cuauhtémoc Medina. Inaugurada en Madrid en el Centro 2 de Mayo, comenzó su itinerancia en el MUAC de México para finalizar en Fundación Proa.

    El catálogo reúne la documentación de las piezas de la exhibición y textos de teóricos de Hal Foster, Cuahutémoc Medina y una larga entrevista del artista con F. Barenblit.

    Jeremy Deller es una oportunidad única para apreciar el uso de los lenguajes artísticos contemporáneos, sus entrecruzamientos y el potencial de las imágenes que retratan un mundo británico, europeo y global, propio de la cultura actual. La música, presente en toda su obra, es tomada por el artista dando cuenta de la relación entre lo social, lo político y la diversidad de los fenómenos culturales.

    Hasta marzo en Fundación Proa – Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929, CABA

    -



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular de Jeremy Deller.
    Autor: Mara Paula Ros
    Fecha: 12/01/2016
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Wipe )

    La poesía neo pop, un luchador travestido, un documental sobre fans de Depeche Mode y águilas que sobrevuelan clamando venganza conforman el imaginario del artista inglés que Fundación Proa presenta por primera vez en Argentina. Curada por Amanda de la Garza, Cuauhtémoc Medina y Ferran Barenblit, la muestra El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular incluye instalaciones, fotografías, posters y videos de los años 90 a la actualidad.

    La obra Beyond the White Walls, en la que vemos un rostro sobre una pared blanca, con una gran boca que funciona como arco o puerta, da inicio a la exhibición.  Una vez consumidos por esta “gran boca” en La Boca, nos encontramos con un video que narra varias experiencias perfomáticas de Deller, realizadas junto a personas y comunidades en el ámbito público. El nombre de la obra (Más allá de las paredes blancas) da la pauta de la desacralización del espacio del museo, y nos invita a tomar una postura activa como espectadores.

    Sus piezas trascienden el ser objetos pasivos: pueden producir situaciones y relaciones. Es que a Deller le interesa trabajar con lo heterogéneo y con la articulación de distintos estratos sociales. Un ejemplo es su creación musical Acid Brass, en la que convoca al líder de una tradicional banda inglesa de vientos de metal para interpretar un repertorio de música acid house en un concierto público.

    En los pasillos de la muestra también podemos encontrar obras como I love Melancholy, donde una pared negra y un sillón funcionan como espacio de introspección, la instalación sobre el excéntrico luchador inglés Adrian Street; Our hobby is Depeche Mode, un documental que retrata las extrañas conductas de las fans de la banda, y English Magic, en la cual cristaliza una mirada crítica y satírica sobre la sociedad británica.

    El universo Deller une al arte con el terreno de lo popular y la estética de la participación, está atravesado por un gran sentido del humor y una reflexión sobre sus raíces inglesas, sobre la historia, y sobre la cultura pop mundial. 

    De martes a domingos de 11 a 19hs, hasta marzo de 2016, en Fundación Proa (Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929). Entrada: $40. www.proa.org



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Resistir
    Autor: Marina Oybin
    Fecha: 10/01/2016
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Radar-Pagina 12)

    Por primera vez se puede ver en Buenos Aires una retrospectiva de la obra del artista inglés Jeremy Deller, El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular, en Proa. Una selección de instalaciones, videos, fotografías y carteles donde se indaga en el complejo entramado entre sociedad y cultura, con foco en los cambios sociales del Reino Unido en la era postindustrial. Desde La batalla de Orgreave (si hieren a uno hieren a todos) que resignifica con 800 actores y 200 mineros la brutal represión policial a una huelga que marcó el principio del fin de la lucha obrera contra Margaret Thatcher, hasta la vida de Adrian Street, un personaje de la lucha libre queer, hijo de un minero, Deller se muestra como un referente crucial del cambio de las prácticas artísticas hacia la intervención social.Hay que volver a ponerse en la piel de ese joven británico que alguna vez fue, ese minero de Orgreave a quien en 1984 en plena huelga para defender sus derechos le lanzaron la policía montada.

    Por estos días en Proa puede verse El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular, la primera retrospectiva en América de Jeremy Deller, artista que marcó el arte actual. Organizada por Proa junto con el CA2M (Centro de Arte dos de Mayo, comunidad de Madrid) y el MUAC (Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo de México), la muestra reúne una selección de instalaciones, videos, fotografías y carteles (“Se necesita más poesía” dispara uno a pasos del Museo Quinquela Martín). Se incluye producción reciente como el video Magia inglesa, con el que Deller representó a Inglaterra en la Bienal de Venecia en 2013. Esta retrospectiva en el MUAC, donde aún continúa, tiene unas pocas modificaciones; también se presentó en el CA2M.

    Deller ausculta la historia de la resistencia en su país. Lo suyo es indagar en el complejo entramado entre sociedad y cultura: pone el foco en los cambios sociales en su país en la era postindustrial. En “La batalla de Orgreave (si hieren a uno hieren a todos)” resignifica el momento en que la policía reprime con 800 actores y 200 mineros que participaron en la denominada batalla de Orgreave. Deller quería recrear este enfrentamiento clave de la lucha de clases del siglo XX que vio de joven en la tevé: esa escena de los mineros perseguidos por la policía, huyendo por la colina, refugiándose en casas de vecinos del pueblo, caló profundo. Es que para el artista esa imagen convertida en ícono de la huelga de 1984 se parece más a una escena de guerra que a una disputa laboral.

    Algunos antiguos mineros de Orgreave actuaron de sí mismos hace casi dos décadas; otros tomaron el rol de policías. Con la intención de ser lo más fiel a los hechos, Deller, ganador del premio Turner en 2004, filmó tanto la reconstrucción del enfrentamiento como el ejercicio de memoria y reflexión de los actores sociales en torno de la mítica huelga. Ejercicio que se percibe emocionante, liberador, y que al tiempo ilumina la trama de la batalla y sus consecuencias hoy. Con este fabuloso video, Deller retomó un acontecimiento histórico clave desde una experiencia artística compartida. “Es una obra excepcional, marcó un quiebre en el arte del siglo XXI: desde que se creó se expuso continuamente en todo el mundo; es uno de los referentes de cómo han cambiado las prácticas artísticas hacia la intervención social”, apunta Cuauhtémoc Medina, cocurador de la muestra junto con Amanda de la Garza y Ferran Barenblit.

    El video escenifica el momento en que la policía montada rompe el piquete que impedía la circulación desde la planta de Orgreave, debilitando de este modo la huelga. La derrota, dice Cuauhtémoc Medina, marca el quiebre de la resistencia obrera contra el gobierno de Margaret Thatcher. Con la recreación de la batalla con los mineros de la histórica huelga, se habilitó un espacio para la activación de la memoria social, para la transmisión generacional de un acontecimiento que dejó huella. Esa embestida contra los mineros se hizo carne para interpelar a antiguos y nuevos trabajadores.

    “Me entrevisté con los mineros en pubs del pueblo y a partir de esos encuentros se generó la posibilidad de reunirnos con grupos de trabajadores para conversar”, dice Jeremy Deller en una entrevista realizada en la terraza de Proa. Deller, un artista reflexivo y cálido, recuerda que “los mineros enseguida captaron el sentido de su proyecto”. El artista indagó también en la vida privada: “A veces la huelga y la vida privada eran indivisibles, así lo describían”.

    Uno no puede apartarse de este video que dura algo más de una hora: escuchar a los protagonistas estremece. “Estábamos peleando por algo más que nuestra lucha en las minas. Eramos muy solidarios; en cambio ahora los muchachos no son solidarios, se afilian al sindicato como gesto simbólico”, cuenta un minero de aquella época.

    Deller desató una reconstrucción minuciosa y potente. Hablan los protagonistas de la historia real: mineros, familiares, policías. En plena huelga, Thatcher acusó a los mineros, muchos de los cuales habían cumplido servicio en las Fuerzas Armadas, de “enemigos internos y de extremistas”. “Cantábamos Los mineros unidos jamás serán derrotados, yo odiaba esa canción, era una falacia. Debimos cantar Los trabajadores unidos jamás serán derrotados”, recuerda uno de los protagonistas de la huelga.

    “Al pasarse por la tevé, el video de Deller produjo un momento de profunda reflexión acerca del ocultamiento de la información: los medios participaron de manera ladeada, favoreciendo la versión del gobierno”, dice Cuauhtémoc Medina. La cobertura de la BBC no fue precisa, presentó los hechos como disturbios. Luego, la cadena británica tuvo que presentar una carta de disculpa pública.

    Si bien en el enfrentamiento no hubo muertos, Deller señala que “muchos mineros podrían haber quedado en prisión ya que para arrestarlos el gobierno recurrió a leyes de hace quinientos años”. “Busqué recrear la batalla, volver a la escena del crimen”, dice el artista.

    En otros videos, Deller pone la lupa en la cultura popular inglesa, captura personajes con intensas historias de vida que iluminan prácticas sociales. Es recomendable ir a Proa con bastante tiempo para ver estos trabajos. El mundo de Bruce Lacey es un video documental de un excéntrico artista que despliega acciones fuera del mainstream de arte. Combina, según Deller, un interés muy británico por el arte y la ciencia. Es un emprendedor de causas imposibles que van desde crear naves escultóricas pasando por minar campos con pirotecnia y muñequitos atados a cohetes que se eyectan a sitios imprevistos hasta, enfundado en capa de superhéroe devenida paracaídas, hacerse añicos en vuelo utópico.

    El imperdible video Tantas maneras de hacerte daño (vida y obra de Adrian Street) nos acerca a un exótico personaje de lucha libre contemporánea que generó un estilo de pelea queer. Hijo de un minero británico, Adrian se convierte en luchador travestido; dueño de una biografía épica, se reinventó a sí mismo bajo la lógica del espectáculo. Adrian logró escapar del sino familiar: su padre, descendiente de antiguas generaciones de mineros del carbón, le decía que era demasiado bajo para cumplir su sueño. Esperando que sonara la sirena bajo tierra, volvían sus palabras como daga: “Nunca podrás pelear”. Dejó el trabajo en la mina, se platinó el cabello, diseñó y cosió con esmero glamorosos vestidos y se subió al cuadrilátero para desatar una extraña lucha. Nunca se bajó. “Me convertiré en una hermosa mariposa, el combate empieza cuando me visto”, asegura ese hombrón puro músculo, después de calzarse un vestido verde emplumado para emprender su artística lucha libre. A pesar de las palabras desalentadoras de su padre, cumplió el sueño de convertirse en campeón mundial de lucha libre de peso medio. Cuando en la revista People le consultaron dónde quería sacarse la foto que acompañaría el reportaje, Adrian no dudó. Volvió a la mina, ahora en el cuerpo de un luchador travestido, a tomarse la foto junto a su padre, “un maldito cabrón, un bravucón fanático religioso que jamás me dirigió una palabra amable”, recuerda Adrian. “Hubiera preferido morir antes que volver vencido a la mina y darle a mi padre esa satisfacción”.

    Con la lógica participativa que es sello en las obras de Deller, en cada sitio donde se exhibe Tantas maneras de hacerte daño (vida y obra de Adrian Street) se acompaña con un mural de un artista local: en este caso de Pablo Harymbat. En Acid Brass en vivo en Lovebox el artista consiguió que una banda de música interpretara un repertorio de acid house con bandas de viento, una forma, señala Medina, ligada a la vida de las clases obreras en el siglo XIX y devenida sonido de confrontación. En 2009, Deller convenció a la organización del subterráneo británico para que los conductores usaran el sistema de anuncio para compartir frases de historiadores, políticos y pensadores que condensan la historia de las citas del mundo popular inglés. Deller compiló un libro con frases memorables para que se pudieran leer en la línea Piccadilly del metro de Londres. Convirtió ese sórdido mundo subterráneo en un sitio donde se desatan imprevistos misterios del pensamiento.

    En el video Más allá de las paredes blancas, en la casa de Marx en Londres, un actor que personifica al filósofo inglés escribe tarjetas navideñas. Deller neutraliza la potencia simbólica del autor de El Capital en la imagen de un ícono pagano del capitalismo. A Deller le resultan hipnóticas la certeza y la poesía del lenguaje de Marx. “La poética es muy importante porque estoy interesado en tomar elementos de la historia reciente y volverlos tema central. Con pequeños fragmentos, busco darles la importancia que merecen. Enseño la historia que me toca vivir”.



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: De la era industrial a la del espectculo, segn Jeremy Deller
    Autor: Ana Martnez Quijano
    Fecha: 05/01/2016
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Ambito Financiero.)

    El artista británico Jeremy Deller (1966) llegó a la Fundación Proa con "El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular", una exhibición cuyo tema son los cambios sociales que atraviesan su reino desde el final de la etapa industrial hasta la actualidad. En la clave por lo general optimista, a veces burlona, pero siempre expresiva del Pop, Deller presenta una muestra multidisciplinaria (instalaciones, carteles, cine, video, muralismo, dibujo, música, teatro y hasta frases de celebridades). El artista utiliza las estrategias de un sociólogo y un investigador de la historia, pero también las atrayentes modalidades del mundo del espectáculo; modalidades que critica, aunque se sirve de ellas sin reparos. 

    Para ver la muestra de Proa es preciso ingresar a través de la boca abierta de una mujer cuyo rostro maquillado evoca el estilo del Pop estadounidense, se asemeja a los personajes femeninos de Roy Lichtenstein o de Andy Warhol. La obra "Más allá de las paredes blancas" abre a la interpretación un abanico de múltiples sentidos, entre otros, se advierte la desprejuiciada apropiación de un británico -en cuyo reino nació el Pop- de la cultura de EE.UU. Así, las distancias entre la cultura alta o baja, la realidad y la ficción, ya no importan. La boca devora al espectador y marca el pasaje a otro mundo. 

    Deller encarna el artista de hoy, sensibilizado por el acontecer político. Una serie de fotografías tomadas por un reportero gráfico en los años 1984-1985 muestran escenas reales de la huelga de mineros en Orgreave. Luego, el video realizado en 2001, "La batalla de Orgreave (si hieren a uno hieren a todos)", es una teatralización de la larga huelga de los mineros de Gran Bretaña. Finalmente derrotados, primero por la represión policial y, después, por la política neoliberal deMargaret Thatcher, los huelguistas marcarían un quiebre cultural que divide a Inglaterra, quiebre que señala Deller a lo largo de su exposición. 

    Para comenzar hay un sillón negro junto a una pared también negra donde se lee el mensaje "I Melancholy", escrito en negro pero en un tono apenas más claro. La pared lleva el color del hollín de los mineros. El sitio web de Proa provee algunos textos y fotos del artista. Deller relata que la batalla no dejó muertos pero sí "heridos graves y hombres condenados a 15 o 20 años de prisión recurriendo a leyes sobre traición de unos 500 años de antigüedad". Agrega entonces que él -como tantos- miró el devenir de la huelga por TV. Hasta que descubrió "una fotografía extraña", una imagen que "resume 50 años de historia". A partir de esa foto, el retrato deAdrian con su padre, inició una investigación sobre el personaje y la huelga de los mineros. La obra "Tantas maneras de hacerte daño (vida y obra de Adrian Street)", narra la historia de un fisicoculturista travesti dedicado a la lucha libre y descendiente de una familia de mineros. Un gran mural representa al pintoresco luchador surgiendo de una montaña de carbón. El colorido paisaje Pop donde se cruzan flores y carbones con un puño violento, alberga un video. Adrian exhibe allí la dimensión gigantesca de su musculatura, su piel aceitosa y dorada y sus pelos teñidos. 

    Deller aclara que las obras sobre Orgreave tratan sobre cómo afecta a las personas un país que pierde su industria, y dice: "Adrian encarna el cambio. Él no es sólo una figura del entretenimiento, un luchador, una persona extravagante. Es una metáfora de lo que ocurrió en el Reino Unido: pasó de ser un país industrial a ser un país dedicado a los servicios, el entretenimiento y la creatividad. Esa fotografía no sólo es la predicción de este cambio. (...) Una vez le preguntaron a Adrian dónde le gustaría ser fotografiado para un artículo de un periódico. Le estaban pagando un montón de dinero para contar la historia de su vida y él dijo: 'Quiero volver a la mina donde trabajaba cuando era joven y quiero ser fotografiado con mi padre'. Probablemente nadie se dio cuenta de que la fotografía era básicamente una venganza. Odiaba a su padre, odiaba la mina, odiaba esa parte del mundo, odiaba todo lo relacionado con ella. Regresó a mostrarles lo que había hecho de su vida. Es como alguien que no sólo tenía que volver: había llegado desde el futuro, como un personaje de ciencia ficción, para mostrarles lo que el futuro va a ser. Parece decir: 'Va a ser luminoso y brillante y no sucio y negro'". 

    Al final de la muestra, en una gran pantalla se proyecta "Magia inglesa", film que envió su país a la Bienal de Venecia 2013. La obra se destaca entre todas por el atractivo visual de las imágenes que, en sucesión vertiginosa, delatan la identidad británica. El desfile de personajes, guardias, enfermeros con sus camillas, trabajadores, militares con sus uniformes más vistosos, está acompañado por la música rítmica, seductora y pegadiza de David Bowie "The Man who sold the World" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSH--SJKVQQ). 

    La filmación del desfile se interrumpe por cortes abruptos donde aparecen dos aves de presa. Allí está Gran Bretaña como un aguilucho pálido cuyas garras se metamorfosean en los garfios de una grúa que levanta una camioneta todoterreno para depositarla en el cementerio de la industria: la compactadora. La elección de "Magia inglesa" para representar a Inglaterra en la Bienal de Venecia es una prueba de honestidad y sinceramiento del Gobierno. 

    Por otra parte, el arte de todos los tiempos confluye en el gigantesco parque a escala natural de los monumentos prehistóricos de Stonehengen con sus torres megalíticas inflables. La obra se llama "Sacrilegio". 

    La muestra deja a la vista otros pecados, en este caso uno real, con el afiche "Harry nos asesinó, una referencia directa al momento en que el heredero a la corona británica apuntó con un arma a un ave en extinción. Acaso para medir el alcance de lo popular, Deller instaló una serie de afiches con temas para pensar en el metro de Londres, citas como "Hay más en la vida que aumentar su velocidad". de Gandhi, o "Un trono es sólo un banco cubierto de terciopelo", de Napoleón, y también hay de Shakespeare, Pascal o Ionesco. 

    Finalmente, "El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular" habla del paso traumático de una sociedad industrial, orgullosa de sus logros, a una sociedad del espectáculo en permanente exhibición. No obstante, el arte espectáculo no es novedad y la obra de Jeremy Deller es en sí misma un espectáculo intenso, cargado de reflexiones y sentimientos. 

    Al culminar el recorrido, en la visita ineludible a la terraza de Proa con vista al Riachuelo, se divisa en un paredón una frase de Deller que escapa el campo de la exhibición y dice: "Se necesita más poesía". 

    La muestra, curada por Amanda de la Garza, Ferran Barenblit Cuauhtémoc Medina, se inauguró en Madrid y llega desde el MUAC de México y en Buenos Aires finaliza su gira.

    -

    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Un luchador travesti, smbolo de los cambios econmicos.
    Autor: Por Mercedes Prez Bergliaffa
    Fecha: 25/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Clarin)

    La muestra del artista Jeremy Deller.Adrian Street fue minero antes de usar peluca y dedicarse a la lucha. Su vida es parte de una obra que narra la caída de la era industrial en Inglaterra.

    “Sólo soy un dulce travesti con la nariz rota”, dice Adrian Street, ex fisicoculturista y ahora luchador bronceado y corpulento. Así lo muestra el artista Jeremy Deller en su exposición, El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular, y en esta obra sobre Adrian, Tantas maneras de hacerte daño (vida y obra de Adrian Street), que pueden verse actualmente en la Fundación Proa. 

    El trabajo cuenta la historia de Street, el luchador-travesti, cuando regresa después de mucho tiempo al pueblo minero donde nació. Allí su padre, obrero de una mina de carbón, lo está esperando. El luchador y travesti había trabajado en esa mina de chico. El padre posa con él en la entrada de la mina, para la foto. La foto es así: el luchador viste botas plateadas, gran abrigo de piel, peluca rubia, mucho maquillaje; su padre, un casco de mina con luz. El padre mira en la foto fijamente a su hijo (¿habrá deudas familiares?). El luchador y travesti odiaba a su padre, odiaba la mina, odiaba esa parte del mundo. El artista Deller habla sobre esta foto: “Una vez le preguntaron a Adrian dónde le gustaría ser fotografiado para una artículo de periódico. Le estaban pagando un montón de dinero para contar la historia de su vida. Dijo: 'quiero volver a la mina donde trabajaba cuando era joven y quiero ser fotografiado con mi padre'". Esa fotografía, piensa Deller, era en realidad una venganza. “Adrian regresó (a la mina) a mostrarles lo que había hecho de su vida. Había llegado desde el futuro para mostrarles lo que el futuro va a ser”. ¿Pero por qué cuenta Deller todo esto? Porque este artista trabaja con la historia, muchas veces narrándola a partir de las vidas de personas extraordinarias (de micro-historias), que normalmente pasan desapercibidas, ocultas por lo “políticamente correcto” o por las grandes historias establecidas. El retrato de Adrian Street con su padre minero trasciende la historia individual: simboliza un país (Gran Bretaña) en el paso de la era industrial a una posindustrial, es decir, a la nueva industria de un país dedicado a los servicios, el entretenimiento y la creatividad. 

    Tantas maneras de hacerte daño es uno de los originales (y fuertes) trabajos que Deller presenta por estos días en la fundación de La Boca. Es, además de la foto, un mural y un video. El mural fue realizado por el argentino Pablo Harymbat. Cada vez que Deller debe montar la obra en un país, selecciona fotos de muralistas callejeros de ese país, de los que elige uno.

    Quizás no muy conocido en nuestra región, este artista inglés –quien no tiene formación de artista sino de historiador del arte- es valorado a nivel mundial, por su obra: inteligente, ácido y con humor (“el humor ayuda a sumar un punto”, dirá más tarde, sonriendo, en una íntima entrevista con Clarín). El artista formula una crítica social poco común y lo hace con una mirada poética contemporánea y sutil y una estética bizarra, de segunda mano, que hace que tanto sus obras como sus comentarios sean dardos corrosivos e infrecuentes.

    Deller declara dónde pone el foco: “Me interesan las personas que representan un momento de la historia, especialmente de la historia reciente. Pero mi interés como historiador es claramente amateur: como cuando era niño y me encantaba leer sobre historia. Lo sigo haciendo de la misma forma”. 

    Otro ejemplo de los focos de las obras de Deller: La batalla de Orgreave, que es la re-actuación que hizo el artista de un evento histórico (una de las más duras huelgas mineras inglesas, que duró un año, 1984, en una pulseada de los mineros contra la política de Margaret Tatcher). Deller hizo la obra convocando a cerca de mil extras, hijos y descendientes de los mineros protagonistas de la huelga, quienes re-actuaron la huelga y los enfrentamientos con la policía. Utilizó para realzar su trabajo una estrategia de moda actualmente, más allá del arte: el reenactment, la re- escenificación de una escena histórica, algo propio de la cultura pop contemporánea. Porque el artista inglés no usa métodos del arte para realizar sus proyectos: “Realmente no tengo habilidades artísticas tradicionales”, comentó a Clarín, “busco mis materiales en otras cosas, en otros lados. Ey, ¡esto me hace sonar como el Dr. Frankenstein! Pero realmente no lo soy”.

    “Deller indaga en la relación entre arte, memoria e historia”, dirán los curadores de la muestra de la Fundación Proa, los mexicanos Cuauhtémoc Medina y Amanda de la Garza, y el argentino con base en España Ferrán Barenblit. “Se apropia de los símbolos, íconos y objetos de la cultura popular inglesa y de sus modos de circulación. La presenta a través de sus estereotipos”. Por eso hay que estar atentos a ciertos datos para comprender la exposición de Proa en su totalidad: leer los textos que acompañan las obras y aprovechar las visitas guiadas. Eso ayudará a disfrutar mejor de un tipo de arte poco frecuente.

    Mientras el artista estuvo en la Argentina –en un paso fugaz- realizó conClarín y Medina una visita al Museo de Calcos, bajo la autopista cercana a La Boca. Callado, tímido -como toda persona poseedora de una curiosidad extraña-, la única foto que sacó en medio de tanta obra de arte fue la de un pequeño insecto verde que luego echó a volar. Leve signo de una apreciación poética y cierto desprecio por la superficialidad del sistema: la revancha del amor por la calle, por las imágenes accidentales, por lo profético, lo mágico. Y por el pueblo.

    Ficha

    “El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular”
    Dónde: Fundación Proa, Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929. 
    Cuándo: De martes a domingo, de 11 a 19. 
    Entrada: $40.

    -



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Las huellas del thatcherismo.
    Autor: Ana Maria Battistozzi
    Fecha: 22/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Revista )

    Ganador en 2004 del Turner Prize, un galardón que consagra oficialmente la irreverencia en un país que profesa el más riguroso culto a la tradición, Jeremy Deller puede ser considerado la contracara de los Young British Artists, El grupo de Damien Hirst, Tracey Amin, Sarah Lucas y Chris Offili que se benefició de la sagacidad publicitaria de Charles Saatchi hasta que Deller lo desafió con posiciones radicalmente diferentes que hicieron foco en las brumosas razones de la política local e internacional a partir de 2000. Por caso, con el video que le permitió ganar el Turner: un lacónico documental que relaciona Crawford, el pueblo de George Bush, con Waco, el sitio de aquella famosa secta de la tragedia de 1993.

     

    Deller vino a la Argentina para acompañar una exhibición de perfil retrospectivo que el curador mexicano Cuauhtémoc Medina concibió con el título El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular, en Proa. Allí combina grafitis, textos, videos dibujos, carteles y una infinidad de fragmentos de la cultura popular que la sustraen de cualquier canon de belleza formal y proyectan su obra “bajo la extensa sombra de la industrialización y desindustrialización inglesas”, como lo definió Medina.

    –Bien distinto de cualquier trabajo de los Young British Artists, ¿verdad?
    –Sí, claro, soy muy diferente. ¡Cualquiera de ellos es más rico que yo! También trabajan de otro modo. Hacen pintura, esculturas, objetos y no es lo que yo hago.

    –Pero imagino que no se reducen a eso las diferencias.
    –Sí, diría que están más bien en el contenido. Ellos hacen arte abstracto y yo no.

    –¿Qué se entendería en este caso por abstracto?
    –Tal vez usé el término en sentido genérico. Quiero decir sin referencias concretas. En mis trabajos interviene la gente, está la gente, son sobre la gente y siempre hay en ellos alguna forma de narrativa.

    –Sin embargo percibo otras diferencias aún...
    –Sí, claro, yo no fui a una escuela de arte. No tengo una formación profesional y los resultados están a la vista. Mis habilidades técnicas son nulas. De allí que deba recurrir a técnicos específicos según cada proyecto –filmes, videos, música–. En ese sentido podría decir que llegué al arte por accidente.

    –¿Cómo sería eso?
    –Gracioso pero real. Yo estudié historia del arte. Pero en un punto me di cuenta que aún con esa formación no había forma de que consiguiera empleo en un museo o en una casa de subastas, las dos opciones para un estudiante de historia del arte. No era posible acceder a algo así. Por eso empecé a pensar ¿qué otra cosa puedo hacer? Y me di cuenta de que disfruto mucho haciendo imágenes. Mezclando estratos de diversa procedencia popular.

    –Inglaterra tiene una sólida tradición de historiadores del arte, podrías haberte incluido en ella... ¿Dónde estudiaste Historia del Arte?
    –En el Courtald Art Institute in London, una institución antigua, diría que bastante pasada de moda, conservadora, aunque no reniego de ella. Aprendí mucho de la relación entre las imágenes barrocas y la Iglesia católica, mucho de arquitectura y también de cruces de alta y baja cultura. Bueno, aquí mismo hay música, bandas, video, pósters, un mural y mucho de parque de diversiones británico. Esta exhibición tiene que ver mucho con el Reino Unido, que es de donde soy y lo que conozco mejor. Pero también se relaciona con otros lugares. Básicamente refiere a las cuestiones que más me interesan o me motivan del presente. Es muy simple y así es. En el caso de English Magic claramente el referente es el Reino Unido.

    –¿Dirías que tus preocupaciones se centran en la sociedad pos-Thatcher o en las consecuencias sociales que se traducen en ciertas formas de eventos populares ?
    –Posiblemente, cuando hago las obras no lo percibo tan claro. Cuando uno toma distancia se vuelve más evidente. Admito que mi obra tiene una marca política pero más específicamente trata del modo en que nuestra cultura se mezcla con la música. Eso es algo que me involucra. Para mí es muy fuerte el modo en que la música se cruza con la historia británica. Y uno de los aspectos que más me interesan es cómo se relacionan entre sí.

    –Esto fue muy claro en la acción Acid Brass que ejecutó una banda de vientos. ¿Qué te llevó a asumir esta perspectiva?
    –Simplemente haber crecido en el Reino Unido y más específicamente durante la administración Thatcher, que fue una suerte de dictadura para mí. Me interesa que las imágenes puedan decir cosas que no pueden decirse por otros medios. En ese sentido el arte es para mí un medio de expresar ideas.

    –Uno puede reconocer aquí el espíritu crítico de la cinematografía de Ken Loach (Riff- Raff) o el humor de Mark Herman (Tocando en el Viento)...
    –¡Oh sí! supongo que la “La batalla de Orgreave -Si hieren a uno hieran a todos” puede ser asimilado al espíritu de algunos filmes de Ken Loach. Pero él es más realista que yo. Lo suyo es una suerte de realismo social, menos poético. Lo mismo en Herman, aunque con mucho más humor. Pero es cierto los dos abordan algo que me interesa y trata de las circunstancias y las huellas que dejó el thatcherismo.


    FICHA
    Jeremy Deller
    El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular

    Lugar: PROA, Av Pedro de Mendoza 1929.
    Fecha: hasta marzo de 2016
    Horario: martes a domingos, 11 a 19

    -



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: La cultura popular britnica, en una antologa de la obra de Jeremy Deller.
    Autor: Tiempo Argentino.
    Fecha: 15/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Tiempo Argentino.)

    Apropiándose de los estereotipos, actores y expresiones más emblemáticas de la cultura popular -del rap a la lucha libre, pasando por Joy Division o Morrissey a la lucha obrera sindical-, el artista británico Jeremy Deller, en su primera visita a la Argentina, trae a Fundación Proa (Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929) la historia reciente de su país en la muestra El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular. Se trata de 30 obras (videos, fotos e instalaciones) que se valen del humor y de las posibilidades del entorno para reflexionar sobre el vínculo entre arte, memoria e identidad colectiva. 
    La exhibición incluye su producción más reciente, la obra English Magic (magia inglesa) con la que representó a Inglaterra en la Bienal de Venecia del 2013. Toda la producción de Deller da cuenta de las circunstancias políticas y sociales propias de la vida contemporánea, al mismo tiempo que presenta una visión crítica al sistema del arte. Así, La batalla de Orgreave (si hieren a uno hieren a todos), es una película que documenta el multitudinario juego de rol emprendido por un pueblo para recrear la represión policial que desactivó la mítica huelga de los mineros realizada en 1984. El documental es representativo de la forma de trabajar de Deller, que en aquel 2001 de la realización del film entrevistó metódicamente a parroquianos de los pubs del sur de Yorkshire para “formar los grupos que luego se enfrentaron en la legendaria batalla, que tuvo la peculiaridad de no dejar muertos”, según contó durante su presentación en Buenos Aires. El enfrentamiento “dejó heridos graves y hombres condenados a 15 o 20 años de prisión recurriendo a leyes sobre traición de unos 500 años de antigüedad” así como un simbolismo mayor, la potencia industrial vencida por el neoliberalismo que encarnaba Margareth Thatcher, agregó. “Lo que buscaba era volver a la escena del crimen, pero el efecto que haya tenido la película en la cultura lo desconozco”, dijo el artista nacido en Londres en 1966 y formado en Historia del Arte, que junto a esta obra expone ocho imágenes tomadas por el reportero gráfico Martin Jenkinson durante el conflicto para The Telegraph. 
    Más allá de las paredes blancas, un video que repasa el trabajo temprano de Deller -acciones en su mayoría efímeras donde Marx se confunde con Papá Noel- sirve como preámbulo de la muestra curada por Amanda de la Garza junto a Cuauhtémoc Medina, del Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo de México (Muac), y Ferran Barenblit, del Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo de Madrid. El video se proyecta en continuado ladeando una gran boca abierta que enmarca el ingreso a las salas y que literalmente hay que atravesar para alcanzar la próxima posta. «
    Más información: <www.proa.org>.

    -

    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Seduction and humour in Dellers show at PROA.
    Autor: Silvia Rottenberg
    Fecha: 15/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Buenos Aires Herald)



    Turner prize-winning artist’s fascination with popular culture flares in new BA exhibition

     

    PROA opened on Saturday the fascinating show Jeremy Deller: The Infinitely Variable Ideal of the Popular. The show is an overview of the British artist’s works: very diverse in form, yet recognizable in approach. It is with great wit, fascination for the margins of history and society and a strong sense of engagement that he develops his artistic projects. Even though the projects could be seen as sociological, historical or perhaps even anthropological works, “it’s art,” he says. “It being art gives me freedom.”

    The show’s entrance is the mouth of a female face on a mural. Deller uses seduction and humour to draw the viewer into his world. The mural is part of the first work: a slide show of earlier performances and installations, which were held outside traditional art spaces — hence its name Beyond the White Walls. By way of illustration, the show includes notices set by Deller on student boards, a collaborative work with a famous nightclub owner, a street-sign for the manager of the Beatles and a very matter-of-fact poem about the death of Princess Diana which he placed amid the sea of flowers at the royal palace. The works give a good example of the conceptual nature of his work, the collaborative aspect and fascination with popular culture.

    On view are also some posters from 1994-96, which he made for a future time when museums would deem popular culture worthy of being included in their highbrow shows. “That is going to be the future,” he says, “for popular culture to be included.” It is not just the future, as the Victoria & Albert Museum recently had a David Bowie show, that is now travelling around the world. When asked about it, he told the Herald: “It’s not on view here, but I did make a David Bowie poster as well ... 20 years ago.”

    Deller doesn’t only have a strong instinct for what the future may hold: he is also concerned about the past. What he calls his Stairway to Heaven, his masterpiece The Battle of Orgreave is very much about the past and how to deal with it.

    The Battle of Orgreave is a historical reenactment of the controversial clash between striking UK miners and the police in 1984. This fierce moment in British recent history got engraved in Deller’s — and not only Deller’s — memory as an almost warlike clash. The imagery of the miners on strike being chased by the police through the village was very vivid. Some were beaten. Thatcher meanwhile called the miners, who, for many years, had been at the core of British industrial economy, the inside enemy. The miners’ anger was not just about loss of jobs, but about a sense of betrayal. This historical moment deserved more attention. When Art Angel had a call for proposals, Deller participated and won with his idea to reenact this confrontation. His research, persuasion and preparation work went on for almost two years. Finally, in 2001, 200 ex-miners who had taken part in the original clashes and 800 re-enacters — who usually re-enact more historical battles — came together to relive this moment of history.

    “It was not intended as therapy,” says Deller. “I purposefully left the film open ended. I want the viewer to feel uncomfortable.”

    And uncomfortable you will likely feel, although with a smile on your face, while looking at the newest video in the exhibition, Rhythmasspoetry (2015), made in collaboration with Argentine choreographer Cecilia Bengolea. It was shown at the Biennale of Lyon earlier this year. Deller had the idea of inviting an elderly white man, a politician from Lyon’s cultural scene, to participate in a project with them. In a conversation, this man, mentions his interest in street art. Street art is the real art, he proclaims.

    While it’s far from uncommon for Deller to combine the unexpected, to keep always on the lookout for melding opposites ever since he made a brass band play acid house in 1997, this man enticed both him as well as his partner in crime. They went out to find street artists; dancers from the ghetto-like outskirts of Lyon, where the majority of the residents stem from France’s former colonies. The result is a video of the man rapping his own lyrics, worshipping the art that the black female dancers perform around him shaking their behinds. He does not see them. They are like moving 19th -century garden statues.

    Deller’s works can be summarized in one sentence but the complexity they carry goes beyond what you see. Rhythmasspoetry can be regarded as a fun video with a strong juxtaposition. A good song and tight choreography. But it deals with so much more: male-female relationships, women’s sexualization, colonialism, blacks and whites, the fact that the white elderly male had an important political position and was surely not from Lyon’s banlieue, like the dancers he admires. It is about cultural power and tension. Uncomfortably disguised as a seductive video.

    Less concealed is Deller’s fascination with extraordinary people, like Bruce Lacey or Adrian Street. These people are not famous, but the artist clearly thinks they should be. Lacey, because he is like a contemporary magician, and Street, because he is “the embodiment of post-industrial England,” as Deller explains. Street is the son of a miner and used to work in the mines as a youngster. He left the industry and went into wrestling. He loves the glitter and glamour of it and puts on his wrestling outfit to return once more to the mines where an iconic photograph was taken.

    “The most important photograph of British history since the end of the Second World War,” says Deller. In the photograph you see Adrian with his father, who still works in the mines. The image captures England’s change from the industrial era to a post-industrial service and entertainment economy. All in that one photograph. Deller was fascinated and searched for Adrian, finding him in Florida. Still all show and vanity.

    Every time the film is shown in a museum, Deller wants the work to be placed on a wall as part of a mural, referring to the Baroque, where an artwork was part of the space. As Adrian Street is — to the artist, at least — the personification of England’s historical and economic transformation, he deserves an entire wall. Local artist Pablo Harymbat made the mural at PROA, inspired by Deller’s film about the wrestler. Deller said Adrian, now 75, was very pleased with the mural.

    The re-mix of his 2013 presentation at the Venice Biennale, English Magic, in which he questions the impunity of the royal family, displays power balances after the fall of communism and the popularized English heritage marks the end of the overview exhibition. The intrigued visitor can find two other works: one in a PROA bathroom and another on a wall that can be seen from the museum’s balcony.

    when and where

    Jeremy Deller: The Infinitely Variable Ideal of the Popular is on view until March at the PROA (Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929, La Boca). Open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 11am to 7pm. Check the website for the screening of Deller’s film Our Hobby is Depeche Mode: www.proa.org



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Fundacin Proa presenta la exposicin "Jeremy Deller El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular"
    Autor: Mirta Herrero
    Fecha: 15/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Pandorama)



    "Beyond the withe walls", 2012 (Más allá de las paredes blancas) video instalación y pintura mural
     
    Desde el 12 de diciembre de 2015 hasta marzo 2016, Fundación Proa presenta la primera exhibición del artista Jeremy Deller en Argentina. La muestra presenta una serie amplia de obras icónicas realizadas por Deller desde principios de los noventa hasta sus últimos proyectos, como “English Magic” (Magia Inglesa) con el cual representó al Reino Unido en la Bienal de Venecia del 2013.  
    Deller viene trabajando desde sus inicios con diversas disciplinas artísticas, como la fotografía, el video arte y la instalación, recuperando la estética pop o popular en cada una de sus obras. Muchas de ellas están presentes en la exhibición, brindando un destacado panorama de su imaginario artístico.


     “The history of the World” (La Historia del Mundo), pintura mural
     
    En las diversas salas encontramos instalaciones, posters, videos e incluso un graffiti realizado por un artista local. Estas obras nos permiten sumergirnos en detalles significativos, tanto de acontecimientos históricos, como es el caso de “La Batalla de Orgreave”, que recrea la lucha de los mineros británicos y su enfrentamiento con las fuerzas policiales en los 80’s, como de casos particulares que reflejan una dimensión social más amplia, como en “Tantas maneras de hacerte daño”, video que repasa la peculiar vida de Adrian Street, minero británico devenido en luchador trasvestido. “The history of the World” (La Historia del Mundo), por su parte, es un esquema dibujado sobre la pared que ilustra conexiones sociales, políticas y musicales entre la música house y las brass bands británicas. Pero es, sobre todo, un resumen de la historia británica y de cómo el país cambió de la era industrial a la post-industrial. 


    Pablo Harymbat -Gualicho-, Cuahutémoc Medina y Jeremy Deller, con el mural "So many ways to hurt you" (Tantas maneras de hacerte daño) realizado por Gualicho por encargo de Grizedale Arts
     
    En palabras de los curadores: “El artista se apropia de sus símbolos, íconos y objetos y modos de circulación. La cultura popular inglesa es representada a partir de sus estereotipos, como una manera de invertir este mismo signo… el artista indaga sobre la relación entre arte, memoria e historia”. 
    Y el artista sobre su obra: “Cuido de no revelar mis opiniones con demasiada firmeza. Obviamente al hacer una obra estás revelando algo, pero no quiero hacer una especie de trabajo político en el sentido que un activista lo haría. Quiero darle un poco más de poesía, un poco más de espacio, para que la gente pueda maniobrar…quiero tener un poco de espacio para el pensamiento y no decir a otros lo que deben pensar”.


    Jeremy Deller junto a uno de los posters  exhibidos
     
    La muestra ha sido curada por Amanda de la Garza, Ferran Barenblit y Cuauhtémoc Medina. Inaugurada en Madrid en el Centro 2 de Mayo, comenzó su itinerancia en el MUAC de México para finalizar en Fundación Proa.  
    El catálogo reúne la documentación de las piezas de la exhibición y textos de teóricos de Hal Foster, Cuahutémoc Medina y una larga entrevista del artista con F. Barenblit.  


    “English Magic” (Magia Inglesa), video. Cortesía Colección British Council, London

    Un vasto programa educativo, proatv, y un taller con el artista son algunas de las actividades que se desarrollarán a lo largo del tiempo expositivo.
    Esta exposición fue organizada por Fundación Proa en colaboración con el Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo de la Comunidad de Madrid y el Muac Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo de la Ciudad de México y cuenta con el auspicio de Ternium, y Organización Techint.  
    Fundación Proa se puede visitar de martes a domingo de 11 a 19 hs. en Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929, La Boca.
    Más información en: www.proa.org.

    -

    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Un toque de irona britnica para recorrer Proa.
    Autor: Maria Elena Polack
    Fecha: 15/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (La Nacin)

    El artista británico Jeremy Deller desembarcó por primera vez en la Argentina con una interesante selección de sus producciones más destacadas, en las que trabaja sobre las capas culturales. El ideal infinitamente variable de lo popular es el nombre de la exhibición en Proa, que sugiere al público, con fina ironía inglesa, que tendrá que disponer de bastante tiempo para recorrer las salas de la planta baja.

    La propuesta es muy contemporánea: hay videoinstalaciones, algunas de más de 25 minutos de duración; serigrafías sobre papel de distintas acciones que Deller ha realizado hasta en los subtes de Londres, y fotografías en blanco y negro que acompañan sus proyectos visuales.

    Dos obras impactan por el trabajo de reconstrucción histórica y de memoria social. La batalla de Orgreave. Si hieren a uno hieren a todos, es un video de 62 minutos en el que se reconstruye el enfrentamiento entre los mineros y los policías que pelearon en 1984 durante una de las huelgas más duras de ese sector. Tantas maneras de hacerte daño. Vida y obra de Adrian Street, es una interesante coproducción británico-argentina. La videoinstalación de la vida de Adrian Street, un exótico representante de lucha libre, hijo de un minero en Gales, se presenta enmarcada en un mural gigante desarrollado especialmente por el artista argentino Pablo Harymbat, o simplemente Gualicho, como él se presenta.

    "Deller empezó con una práctica de relatos y prácticas en situaciones inesperadas. Y emplea el humor como engarce crítico de la situación contemporánea", explica Cuauhtémoc Medina, uno de los curadores de la muestra, convencido de que el británico dejará huella en este siglo.

    En el primer piso se mantiene Forensis Architecture, y en el Espacio Contemporáneo, Maximiliano Bellmann, Cristian Espinoza y Cristian Martínez despliegan su proyecto La invención de la libertad, con la curaduría de Merlina Rañi. La exhibición puede verse hasta marzo próximo, de martes a domingos, de 11 a 19, en avenida Pedro de Mendoza 1929, La Boca.

    -



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Potica, transformaciones e identidades de lo popular.
    Autor: Por Dolores Pruneda Paz
    Fecha: 14/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Tlam)

    Apropiándose de los estereotipos, actores y expresiones más emblemáticas de la cultura popular -del rap a la lucha libre, pasando por Joy Division o Morrissey a la lucha obrera sindical-, Deller recupera en las salas de Pedro de Mendoza 1929 la historia reciente de su país e indaga el vínculo entre arte, memoria e identidad colectiva. 

    Se trata de 30 obras eficaces y de humor sutil que se valen de las posibilidades del entorno para tomar forma, como “La batalla de Orgreave (si hieren a uno hieren a todos)”, filme que documenta el multitudinario juego de rol emprendido por un pueblo para recrear la represión policial que desactivó la mítica huelga de los mineros en 1984.
     
    El filme es testigo de la forma de trabajar de Deller, que en aquel 2001 de la realización del filme entrevistó metódicamente a parroquianos de los pubs del sur del Yorkshire para “formar los grupos que luego se enfrentaron en la legendaria batalla, que tuvo la peculiaridad de no dejar muertos”, remarcó a Télam.

    Pero sí, y a esas capas interpretativas apunta el ganador del Premio Turner, el enfrentamiento “dejó heridos graves y hombres condenados a 15 o 20 años de prisión recurriendo a leyes sobre traición de unos 500 años de antigüedad”, así como un simbolismo mayor, la potencia industrial vencida por el neoliberalismo que encarnaba Margareth Thatcher. 

    “Lo que buscaba era volver a la escena del crimen, ero el efecto que haya tenido la película la cultura lo desconozco”, dice el artista nacido en Londres en 1966 y formado en Historia del Arte, que junto a esta obra expone ocho imágenes tomadas por el reportero gráfico Martin Jenkinson durante el conflicto para The Telegraph. 

    La reactivación de la memoria colectiva; los simbolismos del poder en la actualidad; o la melancolía en la estética popular como huella de la depresión post industrial, son algunas de las cuestiones planteadas por quien representó a su país en la Bienal de Venecia 2013 con “English Magic” (magia inglesa), video que llega a Proa “remixada”.

    Esta pieza incluye novedades como el afiche “Harry kill us” (Harry nos asesinó), en referencia a un antiguo episodio de caza donde el heredero a la Corona tiró contra un ave en extinción: “La poética me interesa para elevar sucesos irrelevantes de la historia reciente y volverlos cosa seria”, señala quien considera que “arte y política no siempre son palabras que combinan”. 

    “Esos detalles de la historia expresan cosas mayores, como el abuso del poder sobre los seres vivos en este caso”, detalla sobre la obra que acompaña al filme presentado en Venecia, donde una máquina destruye una Range Rover, camioneta en que la Reina Isabel II realiza sus salidas de caza y que, ya destruida, sirvió de asiento para que reposaran lo espectadores en Italia. 

    Parte de su juego consiste en “transformar pequeñas historias en elementos míticos o casi épicos, debido a la capacidad de representación que tienen sobre lo que ocurre hoy en el mundo”, insiste el autor de “I <3 melancholy” (yo amo la melancolía), pieza que celebra lo pasivo y potencialmente deprimente de la postmodernidad contra los mandatos modernos de acción y riesgo. 

    Ahí está “Tantas maneras de hacerte daño”, video sobre la vida de Adrian Street, ex minero devenido exitoso pugilista travestido, que hoy vive en Florida diseñando indumentaria de la lucha libre y que en Proa cuenta con un mural de Gualicho, donde se lo ve con su melena dorada emergiendo de la boca de un volcán ladeada por un inmenso labial rosa y gran puño celeste. 

     

    Así como el documental “Nuestro hobbie es Depeche Mode”, que aborda la resignificación de la banda en Europa del Este como una mercancía de la liberación en momentos en que forma parte absoluta del mainstream internacional, y que en el auditorio de Proa se proyectará periódicamente. 

    Deller “rescata lo popular del lugar problemático en que había sido colocado en el siglo XX –lo contracultural, la resistencia obrera y política- y lo hace viable nuevamente, como la escritura de la industrialización en nuestros cuerpos”, explica por su parte Cuáuhtemoc Medina, uno de los curadores de la muestra itinerante que ya pasó por México y luego recalará en España. 

    “Entiende a lo popular como un referente inestable capaz de evidenciar los imaginarios populares –conluye Medina-. Ahí está el juego con el título, que actualiza la idea de Baudelaire respecto a que las variaciones de la noción de belleza reflejan la moral de una época”. 

    “Más allá de las paredes blancas”, un video que repasa el trabajo temprano de Deller -acciones en su mayoría efímeras donde Marx se confunde con Papá Noel- sirve como preámbulo de la muestra curada por Amanda de la Garza junto a Medina, del Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo de México (Muac), y Ferran Barenblit, del Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo de Madrid.

    El video se proyecta en continuado ladeando una gran boca abierta que enmarca el ingreso a las salas y que literalmente hay que atravesar para alcanzar la próxima posta.

    Con esa boca fémina que parece salida de álbum pop -la inquietud apenas sugerida en un niña que se asoma a la cavidad oscura- y la consigna “I love joyriding”, algo así como ‘me gusta cabalgar la alegría’, Deller comienza a plantear la doble función que persistirá en el resto de sus obras, repensar la historia reciente e introducir la pregunta sobre los significados de lo popular y su identidad. 

    Y con ese juego comienza el recorrido por 25 años de transformaciones: La cita de largada es “Te jodieron”, parte del verso con que Phillip Larking abre su poema “This Be the Verse”, que como una premonición al trabajo de Deller fue retomado insistentemente por las expresiones más variadas de lo popular, de Talking Heads a la divulgación científica o la series ‘Skins’ y “Criminal Minds”. Fiel a su tiempo.

    -



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Buenos Aires - Exhibition Jeremy Deller: The infinitely variable ideal of the popular Fundacin Proa.
    Autor: My Art Guides
    Fecha: 12/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (My Art Guides)

    Fundación Proa presents the first exhibition in Argentina by artist Jeremy Deller: “The infinitely variable ideal of the popular”. A selection of the artist’s work will span the range of his practice, from the 1990s to the present day. Deller is the winner of the 2004 Turner Prize and the 2010 Albert Medal of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA). Throughout his career, he has worked in a variety of artistic disciplines, including photography, video art, and installation, and has revived a Pop—or “popular”—aesthetic in each of his projects. Many such pieces are included in the exhibition, offering a distinctive overview of his artistic vision.

     

    Deller’s critical reflection on English culture (its historical contradictions and politics, as well as its identity as a post-industrial and multicultural society) provides a global analysis that traverses both time and borders. As the artist states: “I am careful not to reveal my own opinions too forcefully. Obviously, in composing an artwork, you do reveal something, but I do not want to make a political work in the same way an activist would. I want to grant it a bit more poetry, a bit more space, so that the public can get involved… I want to leave a little room for thought and not tell the viewers what to think.”

    Historical events appear, for example, in Deller’s The Battle of Orgreave, which reenacts the struggle of British miners and their confrontation with police forces in the 1980s, or in his video on Adrian Street, which portrays a British miner who became a transvestite wrestler. In the curators’ words: “If Deller’s work takes shape as a multifaceted process of investigation, it is because it belongs to the rich history of the observers, critics, and thinkers of industrial society.”

    The sequences and dialogues between videos, period posters, and references to the ludic in English Magic, as well as depictions of Deller’s childhood bathroom, provide the exhibition with a panorama of juxtaposed artistic languages, which speak to the multiplicity of images and the diverse practices involved in contemporary art.

    -



    Ocultar nota
  • Título: Jeremy Deller The infinitely variable ideal of the popular
    Autor: E-flux
    Fecha: 12/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (E-flux)

    December 12, 2015–March 15, 2016

    Fundación Proa 
    Av. Pedro de Mendoza 1929 
    Buenos Aires 
    Argentina 
    Hours: Monday–Sunday 11am–7pm

     

    From Saturday, December 26  through March 2016, Fundación Proa presents the first exhibition in Argentina by artist Jeremy Deller: The infinitely variable ideal of the popular. A selection of the artist’s work will span the range of his practice, from the 1990s to the present day. Deller is the winner of the 2004 Turner Prize and the 2010 Albert Medal of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA). Throughout his career, he has worked in a variety of artistic disciplines, including photography, video art, and installation, and has revived a Pop—or “popular”—aesthetic in each of his projects. Many such pieces are included in the exhibition, offering a distinctive overview of his artistic vision.

    Deller’s critical reflection on English culture (its historical contradictions and politics, as well as its identity as a post-industrial and multicultural society) provides a global analysis that traverses both time and borders. As the artist states: “I am careful not to reveal my own opinions too forcefully. Obviously, in composing an artwork, you do reveal something, but I do not want to make a political work in the same way an activist would. I want to grant it a bit more poetry, a bit more space, so that the public can get involved… I want to leave a little room for thought and not tell the viewers what to think.”

    Historical events appear, for example, in Deller’s The Battle of Orgreave, which reenacts the struggle of British miners and their confrontation with police forces in the 1980s, or in his video on Adrian Street, which portrays a British miner who became a transvestite wrestler. In the curators’ words: “If Deller’s work takes shape as a multifaceted process of investigation, it is because it belongs to the rich history of the observers, critics, and thinkers of industrial society.”

    The sequences and dialogues between videos, period posters, and references to the ludic in English Magic, as well as depictions of Deller’s childhood bathroom, provide the exhibition with a panorama of juxtaposed artistic languages, which speak to the multiplicity of images and the diverse practices involved in contemporary art.

    Jeremy Deller at Fundación Proa, Argentina

    Ocultar nota
  • Título: La obra de Jeremy Deller, por primera vez en Argentina
    Autor: Tlam
    Fecha: 07/12/2015
    Ver nota completa
    Ver nota original (Tlam)

    Deller nació en Londres en 1966, fue ganador del prestigioso premio Turner en 2004, expuso en 2008 en el Palais de Tokyo de París y llegó al máximo de su popularidad al exhibir en el pabellón inglés de la Bienal de Venecia en 2013 con su obra "English Magic".

    Aunque su reconocimiento en Argentina o América latina es bastante menor al prestigio que el artista cosecha en países de Europa, en el mundillo local algunos lo recordarán por su paso por la residencia "El Basilisco", que funcionó entre 2004 y 2009 en una casona de Avellaneda, en el sur de la provincia de Buenos Aires, para acentuar el intercambio cultural entre creadores locales y extranjeros.

    El trabajo de Deller está atravesado por una estética pop, la música y una cuota de ácido humor negro y sus obras serpentean por una multiplicidad de medios y disciplinas como videoarte, fotografía, escultura, gráfica, afiches e instalaciones.

    Para entrar a la muestra, el visitante deberá atravesar el hueco que simula ser la boca abierta de una dama, delimitada por el contorno de la puerta, justo debajo de dos grandes ojos y la nariz, junto a la leyenda "I love Joyriding".

    Tal vez, una de las obras más reconocidas en toda la carrera de Deller es "La batalla de Orgreave" (The Battle of Orgreave), una pieza de 2001 emotiva e impactante, que recrea con casi 800 actores el momento en que un grupo de mineros en huelga es perseguido por las calles de esa ciudad, en 1984.

    Luego de dos años de investigación, la acción fue filmada con 200 mineros que habían participado en la huelga original, "como un reality show pero en una versión muy cruda", en palabras del propio Deller.

    "La obra acerca de Orgreave era realmente acerca de cómo un país se desindustrializa, lo que eso hace a las personas, cómo se les trata, el efecto en todo un país", detalla el propio Deller, en una entrevista que le realizaron los curadores.

    "Open bedroom" (Cuarto abierto) produce en el espectador el extrañamiento de encontrarse literalmente frente a la habitación de un adolescente; en esta obra, Deller recreó la habitación de su infancia, con una cama, una mesa de luz, alfombras y atiborradas sobre las paredes, los dibujos y afiches que realizó cuando estaba en la universidad.

    "Esta muestra no tiene carácter de retrospectiva ni antológica, sino más bien de panorámica. Va de los 90 a la actualidad y permite aproximarse al trabajo de un artista clave que aborda muchas cuestiones que tiene que ver con la cultura popular inglesa", explica, en una entrevista con periodistas locales, la mexicana Amanda de la Garza, una de las curadoras junto al argentino Ferran Barenblit y el mexicano Cuauhtémoc Medina. 

    La música es otro elemento central que atraviesa la obra de Deller, como en "Acid Brass", en donde establece puntos de vinculación entre el surgimiento del brass-band, un movimiento musical del siglo XIX, en plena era industrial, (ensambles de instrumentos de viento) y el acid house, estilo post industrial de fines del siglo XX.

    Deller cuenta que estaba aterrorizado de llamar al líder de una conocida brass band inglesa para proponerle que interpretara un repertorio de canciones de acid house, pero éste aceptó inmediatamente y la experiencia fue muy buena. 

    "Me enseñó mucho sobre cómo trabajar con el público. Me di cuenta que no tenía que hacer más objetos. Podía sólo hacer este tipo de eventos, hacer que sucedieran cosas, trabajar con la gente y disfrutar haciéndolo. Podía realizar estos proyectos un poco desordenados, eclécticos y no concluyentes, y eso me liberaba del pensamiento sobre ser un artista tradicional", reflexiona Deller.

    Otra de las perlitas de la exhibición: "Our hobby is Depeche Mode (Nuestro hobbie es Depeche Mode), un filme que realizó junto a Nick Abrahams, en el que viajaron por varios países de Europa del Este filmando a los fanáticos de la banda creadora de hits como "Personal Jesus" y "Enjoy the silence".

    "En los países del bloque de Europa del Este (Rusia, Hungría, Bulgaria), Depeche Mode tenía muchísimos fans. A medida que recorren y filman descubren que la banda representaba una alternativa contracultural. Eran un símbolo de la libertad en la época de la guerra fría. Y ésa es otra característica de Deller: a través de la música introduce temas de índole histórico y político en su obra", detalla Amanda de la Garza.

    La exposición itinerante ya se vio en el Centro 2 de Mayo de Madrid y en el Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC) de la ciudad de México antes de su desembarco en Buenos Aires, donde permanecerá hasta marzo de 2016.

    El graffitero local Gualicho ha sido convocado por Deller para pintar un mural en la pared de una de las salas donde se despliega la exposición, en una colaboración inédita, que se verá desde el próximo sábado a las 17 en Avenida Pedro de Mendoza 1929, en el barrio de La Boca.

    -



    Ocultar nota